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Acronis & Yellow Ribbon Fund provide IT training to Singapore prison inmates

10 Apr 2018

A partnership between Acronis and the Yellow Ribbon Fund hopes to shrink Singapore’s recurring crime rate to a minimum by teaching prison inmates basic IT skills.

As part of the YRF-Acronis IT Skills Programme, inmates will receive certified IT training and computer skills that will increase their chances of future employability.

Acronis, a hybrid cloud data protection and storage provider, partnered with the Yellow Ribbon Fund which is the first and only national charity dedicated to reintegrating inmates and ex-offenders.

Acronis recently donated $100,000 to the Yellow Ribbon Fund as part of its long-term commitment, and it will pledge a further $1 million into the YRF-Acronis IT Skills Programme within the next 10 years.

Acronis says the project embodies the core belief in the ultimate value of knowledge. It also brings together expertise and efforts from both partners to create a better, safer Singapore – one in which education is available to everyone, regardless of social, economic, or cultural background.

“One of our most fundamental beliefs is that knowledge is everything. We’re certain that people with prior convictions can have a better life if given the opportunity to obtain new knowledge and new skills. The YRF – Acronis IT Skills Programme will lower their chances of relapsing and help them restore their lives,” comments Acronis founder and CEO Serguei Beloussov.

In addition to providing ex-offenders the skills to secure a steady job, the training will also improve their lives and their families’ lives, the company says.

“We’re incredibly grateful to Acronis’ team for its initiative and agreeing to share its remarkable expertise,” comments Yellow Ribbon Fund chairman, Wong Ai Ai.

Acronis is celebrating its 15th anniversary this year and says it is proud of its Singaporean roots. It was both founded in Singapore and is home to its international headquarters.

Acronis is also involved in similar projects around the world.

Last year the company opened a school in a remote village in Myanmar for more than 150 children, with more schools planned to be built this year in countries, where they’re needed.

Acronis executives are always eager to share their vision and insights with younger generations by building schools, providing training courses, and engaging in university projects.

Acronis was founded in 2003. It provides data protection services, including virtual, physical, cloud, mobile, and application protection, for more than five million consumers and 500,000 businesses in more than 150 countries. The company also holds more than 100 patents.

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