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Intel appoints chief software security officer

03 Jul 18

Window Snyder is joining Intel, in the Software and Services Group, as chief software security officer, vice president and general manager of the Intel Platform Security Division, effective July 9.

Snyder is an industry veteran who joins Intel from Fastly, where she has been the chief security officer.

Before that, she spent over five years working on security and privacy strategy at Apple and was the “Chief Security Something-or-Other” at Mozilla.

She was also a founding member at Matasano, a services company, and a senior security strategist at Microsoft.

In this role with Intel, Snyder will be responsible for ensuring the company maintains a competitive security product roadmap across all segments in support of business group objectives and continues to engage with the external security ecosystem to apply industry trends and sensing to Intel roadmap differentiation.

More specifically, this involves leading the following activities across Intel:

Industry sensing and response: Driving partnerships with the operating system and security ecosystem to ensure Intel are better informed on the growing complexity of attacks and to help guide Intel’s approach and response.

Applying industry sensing for differentiation: Applying industry sensing to Intel’s roadmap to deliver differentiated security capabilities to secure data, workloads and other assets based on Intel platforms.

Customer-centric route to market: Driving a two-pronged approach to market by partnering with the security ecosystem and the developer ecosystem to drive scale for security.

Commenting on the appointment, Intel software and services group general manager and senior vice president Doug Fisher says, “I am looking forward to Window leveraging her experience in the community and bringing further valuable industry insight into Intel’s hardware-enabled security solutions.”

In January this year, Intel’s processor chips were found to have vulnerabilities allowing hackers access to a computer’s memory and the data stored on it.

Meltdown could enable hackers to gain privileged access to parts of a computer’s memory used by an application/program and the operating system (OS) whereas Spectre permitted access to normally isolated data, possibly allowing an attacker to send an exploit that can access the data.

Intel increased the prize of its bug bounty programme in February, aiming to “more broadly engage the security research community, and provide better incentives for co-ordinated response,” according to Intel platform security VP Rich Echevarria.

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