Story image

IBM Security collaborates to launch anti-DNS tracking service

28 Nov 2017

IBM Security has teamed up with the Global Cyber Alliance and Packet Clearing House to launch a free service designed to give businesses and consumers more privacy and protection whilst browsing the internet.

The solution, called Quad9 Domain Name (DNS) Service, protects users from accessing malicious internet sites that are known to steal information, infect users with malware or conduct fraudulent activity.

The services uses DNS protocols to filter out the internet trouble spots. DNS services translate text-based web addresses into the IP addresses behind websites.

According to IBM Security, many people do not realise that DNS services capture data about the websites they visit, their location and what device they are accessing the website from. This data can be sold to marketers and data brokers by DNS providers or internet service providers.

“Protecting against attacks by blocking them through DNS has been available for a long time, but has not been used widely,” comments Global Cyber Alliance CEO Philip Reitinger.

“Sophisticated corporations can subscribe to dozens of threat feeds and block them through DNS, or pay a commercial provider for the service. However, small to medium-sized businesses and consumers have been left behind – they lack the resources, are not aware of what can be done with DNS, or are concerned about exposing their privacy and confidential information.”

The companies engineered Quad9’s DNZS service so that it does not store, correlate or leverage any personally identifiable information from its users, unlike many other DNS services.

The companies explain that when a Quad9 user clicks on a link or types an address into their web browser, the Quad9 service checks the site against IBM X-Force’s threat intelligence database of over 40 billion analysed web pages and images.

As part of the checking process, Quad9 draws on intelligence from other threat intelligence partners including Abuse.ch, the Anti-Phishing Working Group, Bambenek Consulting, F-Secure, mnemonic, 360Netlab, Hybrid Analysis GmbH, Proofpoint, RiskIQ, and ThreatSTOP.

The service has been rolled out to traditional PCs and laptops, as well as internet-connected devices like TVs and IoT devices such as smart thermostats.

The companies say that IoT devices in particular are vulnerable because they traditionally do not receive security updates.

With Quad9, smart devices would be blocked from accessing harmful remote hosts or botnets such as Mirai.

“Leveraging threat intelligence is a critical way to stay ahead of cybercriminals,” adds IBM Security VP of Strategy and Offering Management, Jim Brennan.

“Consumers and small businesses traditionally didn’t have free, direct access to the intelligence used by security firms to protect big businesses. With Quad9, we’re putting that data to work for the industry in an open way and further enriching those insights via the community of users. Through IBM’s involvement in Quad9, we’re applying these collaborative defense techniques while giving users greater privacy controls.”

Forget endpoints—it’s time to secure people instead
Security used to be much simpler: employees would log in to their PC at the beginning of the working day and log off at the end. That PC wasn’t going anywhere, as it was way too heavy to lug around.
DimData: Fear finally setting in amongst vulnerable orgs
New data ranking the ‘cybermaturity’ of organisations reveals the most commonly targeted sectors are also the most prepared to deal with the ever-evolving threat landscape.
IXUP goes "post-quantum" with security tech upgrade
The secure analytics company has also partnered with Deloitte as a reseller, and launched a SaaS offering on Microsoft Azure.
ExtraHop’s new partner program for enterprise security
New accreditations and partner portal enable channel partners to fast-track their expertise and build their security businesses.
Hackers increasingly ‘island hopping’ – so what does it mean?
Carbon Black's Rick McElroy discusses this new trend and what it means for the new age of cybercrime.
Trust without visibility is blind – Avi Networks
Enterprises are wanting to gain the trust of their customers, but are often found blindly defending themselves.
How to avoid becoming a cryptojacking victim - Bitglass
Large-scale cryptojacking is a lucrative business due to the popularity and value of cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin and Ethereum.
Symantec, Ixia combine efforts to secure hybrid networks
Ixia’s CloudLens and Symantec Security Analytics now feature complete integration, which allows Symantec customers to gain real-time visibility into their hybrid cloud environments.